Category Archives: Financial Matters

Why should we do a reserve study or fund our reserves?

While the question seems simple, the reasons and motivations vary slightly depending on whether you are a manager, a Board Member, or a community resident. So in order to discuss these motivations, let’s first look at the basic reason why Reserves exist in the first place.

Protect and Enhance – The basic, bottom line, cut-to-the-chase principal here is this: Adequately funding the Reserves protects and enhances the physical assets in the community. It also protects and enhances the investment that each owner has made in buying property in the community. It does this by making sure that funds are available to replace worn out components on a timely basis while avoiding the need for special assessments.

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The Science and Art of the Reserve Study

Preparing the annual budget and overseeing a homeowner association’s finances are perhaps the most important responsibilities of the board. It is also a primary duty of the board to maintain and preserve market values of member property. To do so properly, directors must develop a schedule and funding plan for future repair or replacement of common elements, such as swimming pools, decks, paving, concrete, fencing, signs, etc.

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Bankruptcy and Collections: What you need to know

Bankruptcy and Collections: What you need to know

Winter is fast approaching and you may be wondering how your association is going to pay its bills if there is another bad winter.  Your delinquencies may be up and you see no hope in collecting all the money that is due.  Then the delinquent homeowner who was paying files bankruptcy.  Your frustration turns to anger, because the other members of your association are demanding services.  What hope is there to collect an account once a bankruptcy is filed? 

An individual homeowner can file two types of bankruptcy.  A Chapter 7 Bankruptcy eliminates the homeowner’s responsibility to pay pre-petition balances.  A Chapter 13 Bankruptcy requires the homeowner to repay the pre-petition debts to the association – albeit during a longer period of time.  When either type of bankruptcy is filed, the association is not allowed to attempt to collect any debt from the homeowner without first obtaining authorization from the Bankruptcy Court. 

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